Posts filed under ‘General Tips’

Improving concentration

Query received from student:
I have my board exams in March 2009 and I seem to have trouble concentrating. Could you please give me some tips to improve my concentration?
Vineet (NOIDA)

Reply from our FutureMap counsillor:
Dear Vineet,
Thanks for sharing your concern with us. No matter if studying biology or playing chess, is to focus on the task at hand and eliminate distraction is the key rule for concentration. First of all arrange your study place. Get a dedicated space, chair, table, lighting and environment, avoid phones if possible. Stick to your study schedule and find out your prime time. Prime time means the best time (day/night) for you to study at a stretch. Before you begin studying, take a few minutes to summarize a few objectives-what exactly is the task you wish to finish, gather what you will need, and think of a general strategy of accomplishment. Create an incentive if necessary for successfully completing a task, such as calling a friend, a food treat, a walk, etc. Change the subjects you are studying every one to two hours for variety. Alternate reading with more active learning exercises. Do something different from what you’ve been doing (e.g., walk around if you’ve been sitting), and in a different area. When you notice your thoughts wandering astray, say to yourself, “Be here now” and gently bring your attention back.

Advertisements

February 24, 2009 at 6:07 am 2 comments

Archaeologist

Question received from student:
What is an Archeologist? How can I become an Archeologist? Please tell me about the job prospects.

Reply from our FutureMap counsellor:
Dear Anita,
An Archeologist studies past human life and culture by closely examining remaining material evidence such as sites, buildings, tools and artifacts. It is a multidisciplinary science which draws help from geography, history, anthropology, chemistry, geology, art and literature. It is also regarded as one of the four branches of Anthropology, which is the study of the physical and social characteristics of humanity. Archaeological studies or inputs are considered important in issues such as environmental conservation, urban societies, town planning etc. These discoveries involve a variety of field techniques and laboratory procedures.
Archaeology is offered at post graduate level. You can do Diploma, Postgraduate Diploma or Post graduation (MA/ M.Sc.) in different fields of Archaeology. Duration of these courses may vary from 1 year to 2 years. Admission to the two year Post Graduate Diploma course at the Institute of Archaeology, the academic wing of the Archaeological Survey of India in New Delhi is one of the best options. Many Universities also offer this course. At a higher level, you can also conduct research on the various branches of Archaeology; can do Ph. D after your post graduation.

Archeologists are employed in Defense services, museums, Ministry of Information and Broadcasting, cultural centers and historical division of the Ministry of External Affairs. A degree holder in Archaeology can work as tourist guides, heritage managers, interpreters, resource persons of trip organizers in the tourism industry etc.

February 3, 2009 at 9:43 am Leave a comment

Higher education from diffrent stream

The following query was received from a student:
I am a student of class XII Science, but I think I might like to switch to Economics or Political Science for my higher education.
 
Can you please tell me about some good career options that one can look at after doing graduation in Political Science or Eco? I am looking at careers, which will encourage me to make good use of what I learn in anyone of these fields.
Jaspreet (Chandigarh)

Reply by our FutureMap counsellor:
Dear Jaspreet,
For a satisfying and fulfilling career, it is important that you develop goals and plans based on your interests, values, education, skills, personality type, and lifestyle preferences.

Once you have a plan, you can manage your career to take advantage of changes in the job market, rather than become a victim of change. A good plan will allow you to fine tune and make adjustments in your career as needed. Think through why you are switching science.

However to study economics in college the first step is to get good percentage at you +2 level so that you are in the good college, remember peer group and environment do matter to certain extent.
A programme in Economics opens career options in government agencies, business firms, non-profit organizations, and academic institutions. Some of the graduates even enter the accountancy profession and some find employment as managers and administrators in areas such as market research, advertising, sales and personnel.
There are opportunities for advanced professional degree holders in management, finance, law and public affairs. Newspapers provide economics graduates with opportunities to write reports on economic and business events. The demand for economics teachers in educational institutions is growing in India and foreign universities. The Institute of Applied Manpower Research, New Delhi; Institute of Economic Growth, New Delhi, National Council of Applied Economic Research, New Delhi and Indian Council of Social Science Research offer ample job opportunities to economists.
Financial institutions like the Reserve Bank of India, private and foreign banks and insurance companies offer good openings to postgraduate degree holders in economics.
The UPSC conducts Indian Economic Service Examination every year. It is open to graduates in Economics in the age group of 21 years to 30 years. Various international organisations like the World Bank and the International Labour Organisation offer ample job opportunities to well-known economists.
Political science program do lead openings with government and private concern including NGO’s. You can also go for higher studies like international politics, MBA, public administration etc. UPSE and other state level examination would also lead you good career opportunities.

January 27, 2009 at 5:53 am Leave a comment

Improving Concentration for studies

The following query was received from a student:

I have my board exams in March 2009 and I seem to have trouble concentrating. Could you please give me some tips to improve my concentration?

Vineet (NOIDA)

Reply from Futuremap counsellor:

Dear Vineet,

Thanks for sharing your concern with us. No matter if studying biology or playing chess, is to focus on the task at hand and eliminate distraction is the key rule for concentration. First of all arrange your study place. Get a dedicated space, chair, table, lighting and environment, avoid phones if possible. Stick to your study schedule and find out your prime time. Prime time means the best time (day/night) for you to study at a stretch. Before you begin studying, take a few minutes to summarize a few objectives-what exactly is the task you wish to finish, gather what you will need, and think of a general strategy of accomplishment. Create an incentive if necessary for successfully completing a task, such as calling a friend, a food treat, a walk, etc. Change the subjects you are studying every one to two hours for variety. Alternate reading with more active learning exercises. Do something different from what you’ve been doing (e.g., walk around if you’ve been sitting), and in a different area. When you notice your thoughts wandering astray, say to yourself, “Be here now” and gently bring your attention back.

January 17, 2009 at 6:12 am Leave a comment

Career Interest vs Career Security

The following query was received from a student:

Dear Ma’am,
 
I have been told that taking up Science in Class XI gives great flexibility in terms of career choices as one can easily shift from Science to Commerce or Humanities later on but the reverse is not possible. My problem is that I am really not to keen on Science (even when I score high marks in it) and subjects like History and Political Science interest me more. Should I play safe and take Science or should I follow my area of interest more passionately?
 
Rohit (Lucknow)


Reply by our Futuremap councellor:

Dear Rohit,

All these logic sounds good, but practically misleading. To plan your career it is essential to know your skills and interests, which would lead you a satisfying career. To determine your interests, think about what you like to do. Think about experiences you have enjoyed while doing a group project at school. Evaluate what you liked, what you found challenging, and what you may have learned from those experiences. Make a list of activities you have enjoyed during the past few years.
Make a list of skills you have. Think about your school assignment and projects and also the task you have taken independently or with others at home and accomplished.
Evaluate those skills and interests you have listed. Are there similar activities on the two lists? Are there any experiences that could turn into a career? Find out about the types of careers available to you. If you don’t research careers, you may not know about the best occupations to fit your interests and skills.  
It’s also important to decide if the career you are considering is really what you expect and whether it offers benefits you want.
Remember, for every set of careers you need potentials to match with. After evaluating all these if you feel you still want to go for history and political science then go ahead and if you feel you have potential to match with science interest can be inculcated.

January 12, 2009 at 7:01 am Leave a comment